Inventory of the General Library-Jesse Hall-University of Missouri, 1897

Before online catalogs and barcodes, librarians had to manage library collections and inventory by hand.  This 1897 inventory of the General University of Missouri Library contains records of the books, magazines, and journals that belonged to the University.  And, as many would suspect, librarians in the 19th century were just as detail oriented as those in the 21st century.  The inventory even includes the contents of the “Dark Room” which, among many other things, contained one hatchet, a spittoon, and 40 old Savitars.

This volume also holds a letter written by Walter K. Stone, the University Librarian, which was tucked inside the text block.  This letter, written in 1899 to the Executive Board of Curators, notes some library issues and the need for a “competent person” to be employed to help manage the collection.

-Karen Witt

Manuscript Monday: a court document for you legal eagles.  This one records judicial proceedings in the reign of Edward III, including cases tried at Westminster. Date around 1350 (?).  

University of Missouri Libraries, RARE FO Z113.P3 item 8.  More info at the Digital Scriptorium.

todaysdocument
ourpresidents:

President Truman - Just Stopping By
On this day in 1947, President Harry S. Truman stopped by the U.S. Capitol unannounced.  According to the President’s appointment calendar for the day:

"While at the Capitol, the President visited the Senate Chamber, took his old seat, was recognized by the President of the Senate and made a brief impromptu speech."

Addressing the senators around him, he said, “I get homesick for this seat.  I spent the best 10 years of my life in this seat.”
More - Search Truman’s White House Appointment Book from the Truman Library
Photo: Senator Harry S. Truman on the Capitol Steps, circa 1940.

Must reblog Truman…

ourpresidents:

President Truman - Just Stopping By

On this day in 1947, President Harry S. Truman stopped by the U.S. Capitol unannounced.  According to the President’s appointment calendar for the day:

"While at the Capitol, the President visited the Senate Chamber, took his old seat, was recognized by the President of the Senate and made a brief impromptu speech."

Addressing the senators around him, he said, “I get homesick for this seat.  I spent the best 10 years of my life in this seat.”

More - Search Truman’s White House Appointment Book from the Truman Library

Photo: Senator Harry S. Truman on the Capitol Steps, circa 1940.

Must reblog Truman…

theredshoes

theredshoes:

muspeccoll:

theredshoes reblogged your photoset and added:

If you’re not following http://muspeccoll.tumblr.com you are MISSING OUT.

Hey, thanks!  I’m glad you’re enjoying our posts.  If there’s any subject you want us to cover, just let us know!

Aww! (….ooh, any Brontë stuff? I love them.)

Yes! One of our favorites:

http://muspeccoll.tumblr.com/post/83415040442/happy-198th-birthday-to-charlotte-bronte-and

uwmspeccoll

uwmspeccoll:

"I can hardly describe to you the effect of these books. They produced in me an infinity of new images and feelings that sometimes raised me to ecstasy, but more frequently sunk me into the lowest dejection." Frankenstein’s Monster, Frankenstein by Mary Shelley.

Today, we wanted to share images from our Pennyroyal Press edition of Frankenstein, designed and printed with original wood engravings by print-maker Barry Moser. 

Special Collections recently received the latest installment of a multi-year gift from New York collector Jerry Buff. This latest donation of over 1550 books consists mainly of fine-press and deluxe publications, considerably augmenting our collections of several American, British, and German private presses, as well as the work of important designers, publishers, and pressman. We are delighted that the donation included a number of Pennyroyal Press editions, including Frankenstein.

Barry Moser is an amazing illustrator.

Special Collections at the Movies: Hercules

This week’s post is by Shelby Wolfe, a Special Collections undergraduate assistant.

While Dwayne “The Rock” Johnson might not be the first person who comes to mind when pondering the classical humanities, his portrayal of Hercules in the most recent film version about the mythological demi-god might spark your desire to delve far back into classical mythology. If so, check out these Hercules-related materials at Special Collections.

Heathen-Gods-Title-Page

Hercules has entertained generations of adventure-loving readers and listeners for centuries. From pottery and poetry to compendium and comic book, illustrated depictions of the mythological hero are typically easy to identify – a large, muscular man often wielding a bulky club and donning a characteristic lionskin.

This plate in Andrew Tooke’s 1806 edition of The Pantheon details the hero’s attributes. Covered in a lionskin, the main image features Hercules resting his club on the ground. Two roundels above provide a closer inspection of the club and lionskin.

Hercules-Ill.-1

Likewise, this illustration from Tooke’s 1844 Pantheon shows Hercules outfitted with his attributes. In addition, two roundel inserts depict Hercules in the midst of his Twelve Labors – slaying the Nemean Lion (the source of his lionskin attire) on the far left and his battle with the Lernaean Hydra on the far right.

Hercules-Ill.-2

For a more modern depiction of the famed hero, take a closer look at this comic book from 1984. Hercules: Prince of Power features a monstrously muscular title character intent on saving the Marvel universe from rebel military forces in the year 2385.

Hercules-Comic

Whether it’s the 8th century BCE or 2385 CE, Hercules is sure to be flexing his muscles somewhere. 

Holy 75th Birthday, Batman!  We’re celebrating the Dark Knight’s anniversary with a selection of covers from the run of Detective Comics in the Comic Art Collection here in Special Collections.  These particular issues range from the late 1960s through the early 2000s.  What’s your favorite Batman storyline?