It’s Manuscript Monday, and your technical term of the day is zoomorphic interlace. I love the terminology that applies to manuscripts!  This is a little thirteenth-century fragment of the Psalms with a big initial D composed of interlace with some creature features - hence the term zoomorphic.  The Digital Scriptorium database says these might be snakes, but I think their heads sort of look like dogs, don’t you?

University of Missouri Libraries, Special Collections and Rare Books, Fragmenta Manuscripta #029. More information at the Digital Scriptorium.

-Kelli Hansen

ryersonlib

ryersonlib:

Le Retour de la Colonne Durutti, the original broadside printed in 1966 by the Association fédérative générale des étudiants de Strasbourg.

The Student Union at the University of Strasbourg was infiltrated by Situationist-influenced students in late 1966.  They published a pamphlet on the meaninglessness of student life that was widely distributed and translated, and also published this broadside of a detourned comic by Andre Bertrand.  Throughout Western Europe, in Great Britain, and the US, The Return of the Durutti Columni was published either as a four-page foldout or a feature in underground newspapers (from the book Punk: An Aesthetic).

Our student assistants tell us that this handbook keeps appearing in reshelving - but there’s never a request slip to explain how it got there.  Spooooky…
The Radioactive Isotope Committee was associated with the Radiology Department in the School of Medicine in the 1960s and 1970s (this handbook is dated 1977). But I can’t help but think of the Springfield Isotopes when I see it.

Go ‘Topes!
-Kelli Hansen

Our student assistants tell us that this handbook keeps appearing in reshelving - but there’s never a request slip to explain how it got there.  Spooooky…

The Radioactive Isotope Committee was associated with the Radiology Department in the School of Medicine in the 1960s and 1970s (this handbook is dated 1977). But I can’t help but think of the Springfield Isotopes when I see it.

Go ‘Topes!

-Kelli Hansen

peabodywunderkammer

peabodywunderkammer:

Here’s a look at the George Peabody Library’s collection of books and ephemera relating to The Great Exhibition at the Crystal Palace in 1851. First up is a lively chromolithograph of the Crystal Palace and its grounds, showcasing boating, carriage rides, and tourists taking in the sites.

Next we have a print of “Wot is to be” : or probable results of the industry of all nations in the year ‘51 : showing what is to be exhibited, who is to exhibit it : in short, how it’s all going to be done,” a look into the inner-workings of the great exhibition. This particular print showcases inventors with their patent machines for putting down revolutions, subduing Chartism, and grinding paupers’ noses. Of course, the real star of the print is the Prize Pig, because no exhibition would be complete without impressive farm animals!

The next two images are chromolithographic prints showing the Arms of All Nations (because we all know the world is comprised of nineteen countries) and the interior of the Crystal Palace’s exhibition hall.

For a more unique view of the Great Exhibition in the Crystal Palace, check out the Lane’s Telescopic View! This ‘Telescopic View’ is made of printed paper and card, and is supplied in a slip-in card box. When you view the internal scene through the little peep hole in the cover, you see a three dimensional view of the inside of the Crystal Palace in 1851, and the grand opening by Queen Victoria. Cool, right?

Here There Be Dragons

How do you make a dragon student angry?  You send it to knight school!

Bad jokes aside, our fabulous beasts series continues with this week’s feature creature – the dragon.  From our 13th century manuscripts to modern day joke books, dragons are running rampant through our collections.

little-dragon-in-acts

Like this little guy, a favorite of the librarians here, curled around a letter “p” in our illuminated manuscript leaf of the Acts of the Apostles.

The Visconti Uffiziolo

Another dragon drawn from a religious text is this take on the story of Moses and the Serpent.  Instead of his staff turning into a snake as the story usually goes, here we see Moses leap back in fright from the dragon that has sprung forth instead.

toc30048

A bit of visual humor here, from the same volume as the pun that opened this post.

Dragonology

And for all the latest information on dragons, try Dr. Ernest Drake’s Dragonology, found in our Closed Collection.

To see more of these dragons, and others, stop in at Special Collections!

- Amy Spencer

uchicagoscrc

uchicagoscrc:

muspeccoll tagged us in the book challenge and we happily accept. It’s always hard to choose but here are 10 of the many librarian favorites. 

1. Notes on Nursing: What it is and What it is Not by Florence Nightingale (pictured above): This book was hugely popular in its time and did much to dispel myths and distrust of hospitals and nurses. We are fortunate to have multiple first editions and it is a favorite to use in instruction sessions to demonstrate different printing states of the same work. 

2. Everything You Need to Erect Your Very Own Multi-Story Building by Chris Ware (pictured above): We are lucky to have a burgeoning comics and graphic novel collection including this interactive comic by Chicagoan Chris Ware. 

3. Le Roman de la Rose (The Romance of the Rose) and Le Jeu des échecs moralisé (The Moralized Game of Chess): These medieval manuscripts were originally bound together, were separated in the 19th century, and reunited in the 21st century in our collection. Read more about it and see the digitized images here: http://roseandchess.lib.uchicago.edu/

4. Tamerlane and Other Poems by Edgar Allan Poe (pictured above): This is still considered one of the rarest books in American literature. Anonymously published in 1827 by “A Bostonian,” only 50 copies were printed. 

5.Ms. 931, New Testament. Revelation (Elizabeth Day McCormick Apocalypse)Believed to be one of the earliest works of Maximos who is thought to have been an Alexandrian archdeacon. Learn more and see the digitized illuminations here: http://goodspeed.lib.uchicago.edu/ms/index.php?doc=0931&obj=001

6.The Souls of Black Folk by W.E.B. Du Bois: First published in Chicago in 1903, SCRC is home to a first edition. Our copy is significant not only for the work’s literary importance but also for the presence of a postcard photographic portrait of Du Bois dated 1904. It was recently featured in the exhibition Race and the Design of American Life

7. Seaven Bookes of the Iliades of Homere, Prince of Poets… . Translated by George Chapman: This is the first English translation of a Homeric text, published in 1598. Recently featured in the exhibition Homer in Print

8. A Room of One’s Own by Virginia Woolf (pictured above): We hold many early editions of Woolf’s work published by The Hogarth Press. which was founded in 1917 by Virginia and her husband, Leonard Woolf. 

9. The Waste Land by T.S. Eliot (pictured above): Our copy is inscribed by Eliot to Harriet Monroe, editor of Poetry Magazine. 

10. Astronomicum cæsareum (pictured above) by Peter Apian: One of the most remarkable printed works from the 16th century. It includes 36 elaborately hand-colored woodcuts, 21 of which included woodcut volvelles, designed to help the reader identify planetary positions and alignments as well as other astronomical phenomena. Featured in the exhibition Book Use, Book Theory.

Thanks to othmeralia for starting this challenge and to muspeccoll for tagging us. We would love to hear from newberrylibraryhoughtonlib, and uispeccoll

What a fantastic list!  That volvelle with the dragon - AMAZING.