See Spot Run!
Dick, Jane, Sally and Spot: icons in 20th century American education.
The New We Work and Play  by William S. Gray, A. Sterl Artley, and May Hill Arbuthnot. Published 1951.
The Dick and Jane Reader Series was an extremely popular Reader collection used in American classrooms from the 1930’s-1970’s. Peaking in popularity in the 1950’s, it is estimated that almost 80% of Readers used in 1st grade classrooms were from the Dick and Jane series. These Readers focused on whole language and repetition to teach children how to read. University of Missouri-Columbia professor, Dr. A. Sterl Artley, played an important part in the production and study of these books. Dr. Artley won the Thomas Jefferson Award and was a Reading Hall of Fame winner for his work on the series.
- Karen Witt

See Spot Run!

Dick, Jane, Sally and Spot: icons in 20th century American education.

The New We Work and Play  by William S. Gray, A. Sterl Artley, and May Hill Arbuthnot. Published 1951.

The Dick and Jane Reader Series was an extremely popular Reader collection used in American classrooms from the 1930’s-1970’s. Peaking in popularity in the 1950’s, it is estimated that almost 80% of Readers used in 1st grade classrooms were from the Dick and Jane series. These Readers focused on whole language and repetition to teach children how to read. University of Missouri-Columbia professor, Dr. A. Sterl Artley, played an important part in the production and study of these books. Dr. Artley won the Thomas Jefferson Award and was a Reading Hall of Fame winner for his work on the series.

- Karen Witt

It’s National Coffee Day! Just don’t overdo it, or you might end up like this guy.  Too Much Coffee Man was created by Shannon Wheeler in 1990, while he was living in Austin, Texas.  He was originally the subject of a black-and-white mini-comic or zine; the issue pictured here has a color-printed cover.  

You can still enjoy Too Much Coffee Man in webcomic format! Or, find him in the MERLIN catalog.

-Kelli Hansen

It’s Manuscript Monogram Monday this week.  This is the monogram of William Redman, archdeacon of Canterbury, fellow of Trinity College, and bishop of Norwich from 1595 until his death in 1602.  This fragment was presumably produced during his lifetime, sometime after 1590.

University of Missouri Libraries, Special Collections and Rare Books, Fragmenta Manuscripta #208. More info at Digital Scriptorium.

-Kelli Hansen

beckerrarebooks
beckerrarebooks:

If you like spectacular title pages, this one from Anastasius Kircher’s Ars magna Lucis et Umbrae will be right up your alley.  It is incredibly rich in symbolic detail.  We can see the Hapsburg double headed eagle just to the left of the portrait of Emperor Ferdinand III, the god Mercury holding his staff, peacocks - a common symbol in alchemy - and several mirrors reflecting rays of light.
What do you notice?  

beckerrarebooks:

If you like spectacular title pages, this one from Anastasius Kircher’s Ars magna Lucis et Umbrae will be right up your alley.  It is incredibly rich in symbolic detail.  We can see the Hapsburg double headed eagle just to the left of the portrait of Emperor Ferdinand III, the god Mercury holding his staff, peacocks - a common symbol in alchemy - and several mirrors reflecting rays of light.

What do you notice?  

uwmspeccoll

uwmspeccoll:

It’s Fine Press Friday!

In honor of the end of Banned Books Week 2014, we are sharing yet another Limited Editions Club piece: James Joyce’s Ulysses, featuring illustrations and original prints by renowned artist Henri Matisse.

First published serially in The Little Review from 1918-1921, Ulysses was first printed in full in Paris by Shakespeare and Company in 1922. Censorship of Ulysses had already begun with The Little Review and the novel remained banned in the United States until 1934. Here in Special Collections, we have a complete run of The Little Review. Our sister department, uwmarchives, has the records of The Little Review, including those related to the obscenity trial and the banning of Ulysses.  

Designed by George Macy, this edition of Ulysses is set in linotype Scotch Roman and printed on rag paper from the Worthy Paper Company.  The work was printed at the Limited Editions Club Printing Office in 1935 in a run of 1500 copies. The binding is of dark brown Bancroft Buckram, embossed with a design by Leroy Appleton done in gold bas-relief. Most notably, Ulysses also features six original copperplate etchings and twenty photogravure reproductions of Matisse’s original sketches for the etchings on colored paper. The entire edition is signed by Matisse, but only 250 copies were also signed by James Joyce. Special Collections holds two copies, signed by both Matisse and Joyce. 

See it in the catalog here

Wow!  The copy we have in Missouri was only signed by Matisse - I didn’t realize there were also copies signed by Joyce out there.

todaysdocument
todaysdocument:

MAD Magazine Issue #1: A National Comic Book Day & Banned Books Week Two-for-One

First Issue of “Mad Magazine”, 10/1952
From the series: Committee Papers, 1816 - 2011. Records of the U.S. Senate, 1789 - 2011.

The National Archives has a copy of issue #1 of MAD magazine. This copy of the famous satirical comic book is a permanent federal record, and was submitted to a Senate subcommittee on juvenile delinquency as evidence of comics’ corrupting influence on young people. For three days, experts testified on whether or not comic books were “printed poison” for young people. The hearings created so much bad press for the comics industry that it created the Comics Code Authority to self-regulate the content of their comic books.
MAD's publisher, EC Comics, would eventually reformat the publication as a magazine in order to avoid the CCA restrictions. 
(via US National Archives on Facebook)
What’s your favorite Banned Comic Book?

todaysdocument:

MAD Magazine Issue #1: A National Comic Book Day & Banned Books Week Two-for-One

First Issue of “Mad Magazine”, 10/1952

From the series: Committee Papers, 1816 - 2011. Records of the U.S. Senate, 1789 - 2011.

The National Archives has a copy of issue #1 of MAD magazine. This copy of the famous satirical comic book is a permanent federal record, and was submitted to a Senate subcommittee on juvenile delinquency as evidence of comics’ corrupting influence on young people. 

For three days, experts testified on whether or not comic books were “printed poison” for young people. The hearings created so much bad press for the comics industry that it created the Comics Code Authority to self-regulate the content of their comic books.

MAD's publisher, EC Comics, would eventually reformat the publication as a magazine in order to avoid the CCA restrictions. 

(via US National Archives on Facebook)

What’s your favorite Banned Comic Book?

The Griffin, King of the Beasts

The mighty griffin, with the head, wings, and talons of an eagle and the body of a lion, is said to represent power and majesty as the ruler of all creatures.  Which makes sense since the eagle is commonly cited as the king of birds and the lion as the king of beasts.  The griffin is quite common in tales and mythology throughout the ages, and is one of the more well-known fantastic beasts, like unicorns or dragons. 

Griffins are incredibly strong, and are often used in heraldry and crests.  Griffins were also said to be exretemely wise, and, like dragons, had a tendency to seek out and hoard gold.  Adrienne Mayor suggests that the origin of the griffin myth comes from fossil findings of the pentaceratops (a dinosaur with a beaked face and four-legged body), whose bones would have looked much like a griffin’s were supposed to, near known gold veins.

Lewis Carroll even includes a gryphon (pictured above) in his stories as a demanding guide to take Alice to the Mock Turtle.

To find the king of the beasts for yourself, all you need to do is pay a visit to us here at Special Collections – no digging in the mountains necessary!

- Amy Spencer

It’s ALL THE COLLECTIONS joining forces for National Museum Day!  Saturday, 9/27 from 1-3 in the new location of the Museum of Art and Archaeology at Mizzou North.  There will be great stuff from the University of Missouri campus museums, archives, and special collections - and we’ll be there with medieval manuscript activities for kids and parents.  Don’t miss it!

Tumblr reminded me that it’s National Punctuation Day today, so I found this lovely fine press book, A Brief History of Punctuation: Poems by Maurya Simon with calligraphy by Cheryl Jacobsen.  

The volume has poems with titles like “Ellipses,” “The Inception of the Colon,” and “Parenthesis: A Bestiary.” Each poem is accompanied by beautiful calligraphic illustrations that evoke the shapes of periods, commas, semicolons, and other punctuation marks.  As the colophon notes, the book was printed in an edition of 136 and bound Japanese style with marbled paper.

Isn’t punctuation a beautiful thing?

- Kelli Hansen