Holy 75th Birthday, Batman!  We’re celebrating the Dark Knight’s anniversary with a selection of covers from the run of Detective Comics in the Comic Art Collection here in Special Collections.  These particular issues range from the late 1960s through the early 2000s.  What’s your favorite Batman storyline?

Beef: It’s What’s for Dinner! Here’s Mrs. Beeton’s recipe for baked beef, from the 1899 edition of her Book of Household Management:

Ingredients.—About 2 lbs. of cold roast beef, 2 small onions, 1 large carrot or two small ones, 1 turnip, a small bunch of savoury herbs, salt and pepper to taste, 4 tablespoonfuls of gravy, 3 tablespoonfuls of ale, crust or mashed potatoes.
Mode.— Cut the beef in slices, allowing a small amount of fat to each slice; place a layer of this in the bottom of a pie-dish, with a portion of the onions, carrots, and turnips, which must be sliced; mince the herbs, strew them over the meat, and season with pepper and salt. Then put another layer of meat, vegetables, and seasoning; and proceed in this manner until all the ingredients are used. Pour in the gravy and ale (water may be substituted for the former, but it is not so nice), cover with a crust or mashed potatoes, and bake for ½ hour, or rather longer.
Time.—Rather more than ½ hour.
Average cost, exclusive of the meat, 6d.
Sufficient for 5 or 6 persons.
Seasonable at any time.
Note.—It is as well to parboil the carrots and turnips before adding them to the meat, and to use some of the liquor in which they were boiled as a substitute for gravy ; that is to say, when there is no gravy at hand. Be particular to cut the onions in very thin slices.

(via Friday Food: Isabella Beeton’s Recipe for Baked Beef, 1861 | Scripta manent.)

Homer Croy. Our Will Rogers, c. 1953

Homer Croy, the author of “Our Will Rogers”, was an MU student from 1903-1907, where he was heavily involved in the publication of the school yearbook, the Savitar. Although Croy did not graduate from the University, he achieved great success as a playwright and novelist. In 1956, Elmer Ellis, the University of Missouri President, bestowed Croy with an honorary degree. Elmer Ellis donated this copy of “Our Will Rogers” to the University library. This volume gives us a wonderful peek into the friendship between Croy and Ellis. Throughout the book there are many notes and clippings from Croy to Ellis, which seem to be a gathering of inside jokes and friendly jabs. One can imagine what witty response Croy received in return.

-Karen Witt

Manuscript Monday: We often think of medieval manuscripts as being beautifully decorated and illuminated, but the majority were probably workaday copies like this: used until they were worn out, then recycled as scraps.This is a fragment of a homily in Latin, probably from England, ca. 1190-1210.  

University of Missouri Libraries, Fragmenta Manuscripta 42.  More info at the Digital Scriptorium.

providencepubliclibrary
providencepubliclibrary:

"A Booke containing such Beasts as are most usefull for such as practice Drawing, Graveing, Armes Painting, Chaseing and for several other occasions." Designed by F. Barlow, printed in 1664.  (at Providence Public Library)
A request this morning in Special Collections lead our librarian to search for images of unicorns.  And out came this beauty of a book printed in 1664 and “Sould by John Overton at ye White Horse Without Newgate where you may have severall Books for ye same uses.”  
Designed by Francis Barlow who was a London painter and illustrator in the late 17th century.  This was intended as a drawing guide for illustration, engraving, painting coats of arms, and chasing (a method of ornamental decoration similar to chiseling or etching into metal).  
 

providencepubliclibrary:

"A Booke containing such Beasts as are most usefull for such as practice Drawing, Graveing, Armes Painting, Chaseing and for several other occasions." Designed by F. Barlow, printed in 1664.  (at Providence Public Library)

A request this morning in Special Collections lead our librarian to search for images of unicorns.  And out came this beauty of a book printed in 1664 and “Sould by John Overton at ye White Horse Without Newgate where you may have severall Books for ye same uses.”  

Designed by Francis Barlow who was a London painter and illustrator in the late 17th century.  This was intended as a drawing guide for illustration, engraving, painting coats of arms, and chasing (a method of ornamental decoration similar to chiseling or etching into metal).  

 

bplconservationinternship

bplconservationinternship:

Paper mends come with all sorts of problems, and challenges- How well can I tone the tissue? How invisible can I make the seams? How flat can I get the paper and tissue to dry together? Paper mends are intricate, focused problems, and are a nice change from staring at a broken book in its entirety. Knowing which tear or hole to mend possess its own problems as well. Time, money, and necessity are all factors. If less conservation is actually more conservation, that is why we do a “triage” of potential mends. The most obviously destructive ones take priority, then the ones which could have the potential of tearing further are mended, all while taking into consideration their location on the page. In this book I left the holes that the bugs had made, seeing as they’re away from the edges, very round (which would be difficult to continue tearing on their own, and even add a bit of provenance to the book. I also left the half-moon tear (seen in the bottom photo) alone.  It doesn’t seem too threatening at this point in its life, and is aesthetically more pleasing (although I hate to admit it) than my paper mend. 

Amazing Engraved Plates of a Huge Party in Strasbourg, 1744

Louis XV may not have been the most popular king, but when he fell ill and was near death in 1744, his subjects across France prayed dutifully for his recovery.  In October 1744, once he was well enough, the king visited Strasbourg, and the town threw what looks to have been a huge party to celebrate his visit and convalescence.  There were processions through the streets, races, dances, and even fireworks.  These events were all faithfully chronicled by J. M. Weis, “graveur de la ville de Strasbourg,” and produced in the nearly monumental format of a large folio with two-page spreads. This is a fete book – a royal souvenir for a royal celebration.

The MU Libraries copy is still in the original binding, and if you follow our Adopt a Book program, you may recognize it.  William Heyde III recently donated funds to support conservation work, and Jim Downey at Legacy Bookbindery made the repairs the volume needed.  Once the book was in stable condition, we were able to send it to the MU Libraries Digital Services unit. So, thanks to a generous donor, a conservator, a couple of rare book librarians, and several digital imaging and metadata experts, this book is now available to the world.  We think that in itself is cause for celebration!  

Get a closer look at the plates or page through the text in the University of Missouri Digital Library.  Be sure to use the zoom feature to take in the details – the variety of tiny figures that populate these prints is really amazing.

Weis, Johann Martin, d. ca. 1795. Représentation des fêtes données par la ville de Strasbourg pour la convalescence du Roi; à l’arrivée et pendant le séjour de Sa Majesté en cette ville. Inventé, dessiné et dirigé par J. M. Weiss, graveur de la ville de Strasbourg. Paris: imprimë par Laurent Aubert [1745]. MERLIN catalog record

- Kelli Hansen

biolumo asked:

1. How many followers do you have? 2. How long has this Tumblr been going? 3. How many people participate in running the Tumblr? 4. What are your majors? Are you undergrad or postgrad? 5. Is this Tumblr tied in with any clubs or societies? 6. Have you done any outside promoting to get followers? 7. Do the people that run this blog have jobs or internships at the library that enable them to access the special collections whenever they want, or is there some other arrangement? Thanks!
  1.  As of today, 4,998.  (Who will be our 5,000th follower???)
  2. We started this Tumblr 4 months ago, in March 2014.  We’ve been so amazed by the great response and wonderful community here.
  3. We’re a department of 3 professional librarians, a graduate assistant, and 3 undergrad assistants.  One person coordinates our social media, but we all participate in finding cool stuff, making scans and photos, and writing posts.
  4. I’m a librarian, and our staff has a wide range of interests. Among the three librarians, we have bachelor’s degrees in art history, Spanish literature, education, and Russian literature, and master’s degrees in Russian and art history.  All three of us also have master’s degrees in library science.  Our graduate assistant is getting a PhD in English with an emphasis in Anglo-Saxon.  Our amazing undergrads have lots of majors among the three of them: art history, political science, linguistics, theatre, and English – and our two graduating seniors (sob) are going off to library school and law school in the fall. 
  5. Nope, just us.  We are a division of the University of Missouri Libraries, but that’s not really a club or society…
  6. Not really, mostly just some cross-promoting on our Facebook and Twitter.  When we launched our Tumblr, we put up some flyers in classroom buildings on our campus, and we will probably do that again when school starts.  We also put links to all our social media presences on our department’s brochures, postcards, bookmarks, email signatures, and anywhere else we can think of.
  7. Yes – all of our current contributors work in the Special Collections department.  

Any other questions, feel free to ask!

Best, 

Kelli